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Thread: Bait casting or spinning reel for heaver?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Bait casting or spinning reel for heaver?

    I'm going to purchase an 11' rod for a Hatteras heaver. Is a conventional set up the way to go or can it be done with a large spinning reel? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2004
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    Since I dont know what I am talking about But I am going to tell you. It's up to you and your abilities. there are times It would be nice to throw a spinner just for the simple easy of it. I prefer Conventional and so do most of the regulars. there are a few regulars that prefeer spinners and they are darn good at throwing them. Buy both and fish each acording to conditions is choice to.

  3. #3
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    I have not yet learned how to throw a conventional so I use a spinner. With the exception of me hookin into a big biter I have not had any issues reeling in what I hook (I am not saying I catch monsters all day long but 15-40lbs, never had an issue)

    I am looking to learn how to throw a con. but have to get the $$$ together for a nice rod and reel first. IMO if you are a casual fisherman(women) you will be fine with a spinner. If it is your first time to the beach and are learning, a spinner will be fine. IF you are jumping in head first and looking to make this your hobby, spend the time and money to learn a con.

    Peraonally I like my current setup
    Shimano Baitcaster 6500 on a Tica T2 11'00" spooled with 17# Suffix. Not the longest thrower on the beach, but good feel and will chuck the big B+8 as far as I can.

    Have fun and use what you feel comforatable with.

    Tight Lines
    Chris
    September Maybe?
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  4. #4
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    You can do it either way but you ought to consider setting up and learning (practice, practice, practice) the conventional. The spinning reel doesn't have the bird nesting nature of a conventional but that's about all the positives it offers for an 8nbait. Throwing metal is a totally different story. Conventionals offer the ability to cast further with the proper technique WHEN NEEDED, however, a longer cast DOES NOT always equal more fish. Plus conventional reels offer better retrieving/fighting. Think about it. When your stuck in a ravine off the side of the road in Deliverance and Billy Bob and his brother/cousin Bill Bobby come to your rescue in their tow truck, does the winch look like a conventional reel or a spinning reel?
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  5. #5
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    The pros and cons of spinning versus conventional is all based on the opinion of the person holding the rod. There is good equipment out there for either style. I've seen guys throw a heaver with a big spinning reel on it way farther than I'll ever be able to in this life time. Same goes for the conventional. When I decided to buy a heaver I went the conventional route. I've been fishing bait cast reels for bass for the past 30 years and that's what I'm comfortable with so I figured the conventional would suit my style better. Its all a matter of personal preference. Buy quality gear and you will be happy. RDT has a ton of equipment for you to put your hands on.
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  6. #6
    Bill Tipton Guest
    I would put my money in a conventional for some of the reason JP listed. It's hard to fight a big fish and adjust your drag at the same time on a spinning reel. As far as casting, you can only cast far if you practice. You can utube casting and get an idea on how its done, their is a lot of different casting techniques you can look at. I rigged me up a baseball with a eye to tie too and that what I practice with.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bark View Post
    The pros and cons of spinning versus conventional is all based on the opinion of the person holding the rod. There is good equipment out there for either style. I've seen guys throw a heaver with a big spinning reel on it way farther than I'll ever be able to in this life time. Same goes for the conventional. When I decided to buy a heaver I went the conventional route. I've been fishing bait cast reels for bass for the past 30 years and that's what I'm comfortable with so I figured the conventional would suit my style better. Its all a matter of personal preference. Buy quality gear and you will be happy. RDT has a ton of equipment for you to put your hands on.
    Agree 99%, the remainder being fighting power. Cons have much better fighting strength than spinning reels. For the fish most of us are after it's not a big deal, but it does get the fish back into the water with more energy.
    .02 again.
    Why am I so addicted to catching a fish I can't keep?!

  8. #8
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    Folks are right, it all depends on what you are comfortable with. I have both. I mainly use the spinning outfit right now because that is what I have always used (except for boat fishing). I bought a used conventional setup that I practice with while waiting for the bite to happen.

    With the spinning gear you really have to fling it out there, takes a lot of effort. With the conventional it takes much less uuumph and more finesse. From my limited practicing, the conventional will cast farther and more accurately with much less effort. An example. I put a squidder on a 9 Tsunami (wrapped spinning) and tossed 4 ounces. Then I put a Stradic 4000 (or maybe a 5000) on it and did the same. I could easily match the spinning reel distance with minimal effort. The conventional was more of a lob rather than a throw.

  9. #9
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    Back in the spring I bought a magazine. In fisherman catfish edition. Still trying to relocate it...It had an article about distance casting. If I remember right they all used spinning outfits. And if I remember right the world record was done with a spinning reel.

  10. #10
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    Tommy Farmer has lots to say on this subject

    http://carolinacastpro.com/

    He is one of us - a member here and a member of NCBBA, etc.
    NCBBA Secret Agent #13007
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  11. #11
    SINNER Guest
    I like Zebco 202's, but Young Salt bought them all. Only thing he can wrap his little hands around. Lee uses 12/0 senators trying to compensate for something. IDK. Wayne's donut holes were WAAAAAYYYYY bigger.

    What do I know though. I'm too busy chasing @$*)(* to fish.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SINNER View Post
    I like Zebco 202's, but Young Salt bought them all. Only thing he can wrap his little hands around.

    YS has little hands?? I think I saw him doing a Burger King commercial!!!
    Bob Anderson

    "I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore!"

  13. #13
    SINNER Guest
    They used an actor to protect his identity.

    Based on a true story. giggle

  14. #14
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    Sep 2005
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    Until this July, I would have doubted that a spinning reel would be suitable with a truly big fish. After catching numerous 30 +pound amberjacks on spinning gear, I no longer have that doubt. I am going to get a new heaver, and I think I will go with a spinning reel.

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    Charlotte
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    My suggestion would be to go with conventional. Despite all the stories out there for the past century, conventionals are not that hard to learn to use. With the advances in equipment and a few hours practice, just about anybody can cast one. Get a Diawa SLOSH 30, put the red brakes in, load it up with cheap 20# line and go find a field. I would bet that if you tighten everything down when you first start, you will be surprised at how easy it is. Start to losen one thing at a time until you start to get some over run. Practice some more at that setting until it stops, then losen somemore. Keep going until you blow it up, back down a hair, and you will be set.

    My choice for you is based more on the acceptance you will find at the point than the pro's or con's of one real vs. the other. Everyone ends up getting crossed up there. You can not put 100 people in a small space during a drum bite and it not happen. If you are holding a spinning setup your chances of getting screamed at and called a Barney go up considerably.....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cutbait Bob View Post
    YS has little hands?? I think I saw him doing a Burger King commercial!!!
    You were obviously talking to my wife and she obviously confused me with Willard!
    Why am I so addicted to catching a fish I can't keep?!

  17. #17
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    For heavy spinners I use Shimano Thunus 12000 and 16000.

    They are like the Shimano Baitrunner series but have a better body that won't flex at the mount in fighting a big fish. They do cost about twice what a Baitrunner does. They are specifically designed for big fish heavy salt water use.

    They also have an improved wrap system that keeps the line from digging into the spool when fighting a big fish. The wrap scheme also improves distance as it allows the line to come off the spool with less friction.

    The other advantage is there are two drags. The main drag can be set for fighting a big fish. The baitrunner drag can be set loose so the fish can pick up and move off with the bait. When the baitrunner drag is set, the main drag is disengaged. When ready to set the hook about a 1/4 turn of the crank sets the main drag and disengages the baitrunner.

    Using a Cannon I can get about the same distance with them as my conventionals throwing 8-10 oz plus bait.

    With a couple extra spools available, I seldom have to stop fishing very long when something goes wrong, especially at night.
    Cheers Ya'll

    Ted A. Hamilton
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